Procrete

The Red Road flats, Glasgow, Scotland (circa 1969).
The Red Road flats complex was one of the most ambitious schemes built by the Glasgow Corporation to tackle the housing crisis in the city created as a result of the slum clearances in the inner city. They were, at the time, the tallest residential blocks in Europe and the estate was planned to house nearly 5,000 people.
The estate fell into decline rapidly, initially due to economic depression bringing about further socio-economic problems. The use of asbestos to protect the unique steel structures of the blocks also caused further issues. The blocks have now been condemned for demolition and the first was brought down today using explosives. View high resolution

The Red Road flats, Glasgow, Scotland (circa 1969).

The Red Road flats complex was one of the most ambitious schemes built by the Glasgow Corporation to tackle the housing crisis in the city created as a result of the slum clearances in the inner city. They were, at the time, the tallest residential blocks in Europe and the estate was planned to house nearly 5,000 people.

The estate fell into decline rapidly, initially due to economic depression bringing about further socio-economic problems. The use of asbestos to protect the unique steel structures of the blocks also caused further issues. The blocks have now been condemned for demolition and the first was brought down today using explosives.

Kemp House, Soho, London (circa 1961).
Set within a maze of narrow streets, the 18 storey block was an unexpected high rise feature in the Soho area of London. It is set on top of a 3 storey slab block of shops and offices. It was designed by Riches and Blythin for Westminster City Council as the first large development in response to London County Council’s demand for mixed-use schemes in central areas. The block was built using a insitu reinforced concrete structure, faced with brick and reconstructed stone. View high resolution

Kemp House, Soho, London (circa 1961).

Set within a maze of narrow streets, the 18 storey block was an unexpected high rise feature in the Soho area of London. It is set on top of a 3 storey slab block of shops and offices. It was designed by Riches and Blythin for Westminster City Council as the first large development in response to London County Council’s demand for mixed-use schemes in central areas. The block was built using a insitu reinforced concrete structure, faced with brick and reconstructed stone.

Grandcourt, Eastbourne, East Sussex, UK (circa 1961).
Designed by H. Hubbard Ford, Grandcourt stood as a modern intervention in a relatively traditional seaside resort. Providing a total of 55 one to four bedroom flats, the block is 8 storeys tall, with a prominent corner block and an adjacent block with two setback storeys at the top. The lower two floors are set back from circular columns. The block is topped with numerous curved concrete shell roofs. View high resolution

Grandcourt, Eastbourne, East Sussex, UK (circa 1961).

Designed by H. Hubbard Ford, Grandcourt stood as a modern intervention in a relatively traditional seaside resort. Providing a total of 55 one to four bedroom flats, the block is 8 storeys tall, with a prominent corner block and an adjacent block with two setback storeys at the top. The lower two floors are set back from circular columns. The block is topped with numerous curved concrete shell roofs.

Whitley Lodge, Whitley Bay, Northumberland, UK (circa 1961).
The 11 storey block, with a simple arrangement of four flats per floor, provides scenic views over the cliffs and coastline at the bay, as well as over farmland inland. The flats contain 2 bedrooms as well as 2 balconies - one for clothes drying and the other for refuse disposal.
Designed by Ryder and Yates, it was built with an insitu reinforced concrete structure, with columns supporting plate floors. On the roof is an elliptical machine room clad with glass. View high resolution

Whitley Lodge, Whitley Bay, Northumberland, UK (circa 1961).

The 11 storey block, with a simple arrangement of four flats per floor, provides scenic views over the cliffs and coastline at the bay, as well as over farmland inland. The flats contain 2 bedrooms as well as 2 balconies - one for clothes drying and the other for refuse disposal.

Designed by Ryder and Yates, it was built with an insitu reinforced concrete structure, with columns supporting plate floors. On the roof is an elliptical machine room clad with glass.

The Cerro Piloto housing group, Caracas, Venezuela (circa 1957).
Designed by Guido Bermudez, this group of social housing blocks were built to replace the shanty town on the side of the hill on which the blocks now occupy. Squatters were given the opportunity to live in the blocks, however, attitudes towards the blocks were generally unfavourable. Many chose not to live there as they were more suited to low rise properties, so 4 storey blocks were built around 1958. View high resolution

The Cerro Piloto housing group, Caracas, Venezuela (circa 1957).

Designed by Guido Bermudez, this group of social housing blocks were built to replace the shanty town on the side of the hill on which the blocks now occupy. Squatters were given the opportunity to live in the blocks, however, attitudes towards the blocks were generally unfavourable. Many chose not to live there as they were more suited to low rise properties, so 4 storey blocks were built around 1958.

Image from an advertisement brochure for an apartment building in Milan, Italy (circa 1956).
The 32 storey apartment building was designed by E. & E. Soncini and Luigi Mattioni. It was built between 1951 and 1955, with a reinforced concrete frame. View high resolution

Image from an advertisement brochure for an apartment building in Milan, Italy (circa 1956).

The 32 storey apartment building was designed by E. & E. Soncini and Luigi Mattioni. It was built between 1951 and 1955, with a reinforced concrete frame.

A block of reinforced concrete framed flats in Porte Molitor, France (circa January 1953).
Le Corbusier had a flat on the top floor. View high resolution

A block of reinforced concrete framed flats in Porte Molitor, France (circa January 1953).

Le Corbusier had a flat on the top floor.

The construction of Westfield flats, Gorgie, Edinburgh, Scotland (circa January 1951).
A crescent-shaped 8 storey block of 90 flats, designed for single women and the elderly. A nursery school was constructed for the top floor. Designed by Williamson & Hubbard. View high resolution

The construction of Westfield flats, Gorgie, Edinburgh, Scotland (circa January 1951).

A crescent-shaped 8 storey block of 90 flats, designed for single women and the elderly. A nursery school was constructed for the top floor. Designed by Williamson & Hubbard.

The Countess Road project, Walthamstow, London (circa 1947).

The Countess Road project included twenty 6 storey blocks of social housing. Car usage was minimised to prevent injuries and shops were provided on site to promote a local economy in the estate.

Dixon Street flats, Wellington, New Zealand (circa 1947).
Constructed in 1936, this block provided 116 one bedroom flats for workers on a one acre site. Constructed using a cellular system, doing away with columns and beams, making the building more earthquake resistant.

Dixon Street flats, Wellington, New Zealand (circa 1947).

Constructed in 1936, this block provided 116 one bedroom flats for workers on a one acre site. Constructed using a cellular system, doing away with columns and beams, making the building more earthquake resistant.