Procrete

11 storey blocks on the Group 1 and Area A developments under construction on the Castle Vale estate, Birmingham, UK (circa 1965). View high resolution

11 storey blocks on the Group 1 and Area A developments under construction on the Castle Vale estate, Birmingham, UK (circa 1965).

(Source: procrete)

Flats in Balatonfured, Hungary (circa 1964).
Completed in 1963 and designed by Marton. View high resolution

Flats in Balatonfured, Hungary (circa 1964).

Completed in 1963 and designed by Marton.

The Beke road housing scheme, Budapest, Hungary (circa 1964).
Completed in 1960 and designed by Boros in collaboration with planners Mester and Krivatsky. View high resolution

The Beke road housing scheme, Budapest, Hungary (circa 1964).

Completed in 1960 and designed by Boros in collaboration with planners Mester and Krivatsky.

Point Royal, Bracknell, Berkshire, UK (circa 1964).

Bracknell was chosen as a New Town in 1948, with plans to expand it from a small market town of 5,000 to a light industrial town of around 25,000 people. Point Royal was constructed as a symbol of the future for the town. Designed by Ove Arup, the tower dominated the local area and eventually became the only high rise social housing block to be constructed in the town.

It contains 102 flats, which unusually extend into the structural core of the building, which were specifically meant to accommodate childless couples and single persons. The unusual hexagonal shape plan was pursued as it was the most structurally economical for the job as well as making it possible for all rooms to be rectangular shape in plan, with the exception of the corner sitting room. Catchment sockets were incorporated into the external columns to collect rainwater and prevent water damage to the facade, and large unbroken expanses of concrete were avoided also.

In 1998, Point Royal became a Grade II listed building.

(Source: procrete)

Notting Hill Gate, Notting Hill, London (circa 1962).

Through acquiring land for the widening of the main road through Notting Hill Gate, London County Council were left with an opportunity to revive the area as a shopping location. The in-house architects department developed plans for a mixed use project incorporating shops, offices and residential flats in blocks of varying heights. Construction began in January 1959 and was completed in 1962.

Viaduct 688 and Slotervaart, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (circa 1962).
The viaduct is one of 10 along the route of Amsterdam’s first elevated roadway, the Cornelis Lelylaan. It crosses the Slotervaart neighbourhood, an entirely postwar constructed community consisting of predominantly mid-rise residential blocks. View high resolution

Viaduct 688 and Slotervaart, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (circa 1962).

The viaduct is one of 10 along the route of Amsterdam’s first elevated roadway, the Cornelis Lelylaan. It crosses the Slotervaart neighbourhood, an entirely postwar constructed community consisting of predominantly mid-rise residential blocks.

South elevation of Hide Tower, Pimlico, London (circa 1962).
At the time the tallest residential tower in the UK, Hide Tower is a 22 storey block of 162 flats. It was built for Westminster City Council by John Laing Construction Co to a design by Stillman and Eastwick-Field. It was constructed using a combination of precast concrete and in-situ concrete elements, using several experimental techniques which were tried and tested during construction and then later applied to other projects across the country.
The footprint of the building adheres to a rigid rectangular plan, with all services and balconies located within the confines of the building line. The modern facilities and spectacular views from the upper floors were well-received by the residents, who were predominantly elderly, when the building opened. It marked a turning point in the history of tower block design and construction in the UK. View high resolution

South elevation of Hide Tower, Pimlico, London (circa 1962).

At the time the tallest residential tower in the UK, Hide Tower is a 22 storey block of 162 flats. It was built for Westminster City Council by John Laing Construction Co to a design by Stillman and Eastwick-Field. It was constructed using a combination of precast concrete and in-situ concrete elements, using several experimental techniques which were tried and tested during construction and then later applied to other projects across the country.

The footprint of the building adheres to a rigid rectangular plan, with all services and balconies located within the confines of the building line. The modern facilities and spectacular views from the upper floors were well-received by the residents, who were predominantly elderly, when the building opened. It marked a turning point in the history of tower block design and construction in the UK.

Artist’s impression of the Idonia Street Flats (Maple House), Deptford, London (circa 1947).
Maple House was built in the late 1940s as one of the first social housing responses to the housing crisis in London after World War II. The 5 storey block of 60 deck access flats contrasts massively with the social housing blocks that were started to be built just 10 years later.

Artist’s impression of the Idonia Street Flats (Maple House), Deptford, London (circa 1947).

Maple House was built in the late 1940s as one of the first social housing responses to the housing crisis in London after World War II. The 5 storey block of 60 deck access flats contrasts massively with the social housing blocks that were started to be built just 10 years later.

The Red Road flats, Glasgow, Scotland (circa 1969).
The Red Road flats complex was one of the most ambitious schemes built by the Glasgow Corporation to tackle the housing crisis in the city created as a result of the slum clearances in the inner city. They were, at the time, the tallest residential blocks in Europe and the estate was planned to house nearly 5,000 people.
The estate fell into decline rapidly, initially due to economic depression bringing about further socio-economic problems. The use of asbestos to protect the unique steel structures of the blocks also caused further issues. The blocks have now been condemned for demolition and the first was brought down today using explosives. View high resolution

The Red Road flats, Glasgow, Scotland (circa 1969).

The Red Road flats complex was one of the most ambitious schemes built by the Glasgow Corporation to tackle the housing crisis in the city created as a result of the slum clearances in the inner city. They were, at the time, the tallest residential blocks in Europe and the estate was planned to house nearly 5,000 people.

The estate fell into decline rapidly, initially due to economic depression bringing about further socio-economic problems. The use of asbestos to protect the unique steel structures of the blocks also caused further issues. The blocks have now been condemned for demolition and the first was brought down today using explosives.

Kemp House, Soho, London (circa 1961).
Set within a maze of narrow streets, the 18 storey block was an unexpected high rise feature in the Soho area of London. It is set on top of a 3 storey slab block of shops and offices. It was designed by Riches and Blythin for Westminster City Council as the first large development in response to London County Council’s demand for mixed-use schemes in central areas. The block was built using a insitu reinforced concrete structure, faced with brick and reconstructed stone. View high resolution

Kemp House, Soho, London (circa 1961).

Set within a maze of narrow streets, the 18 storey block was an unexpected high rise feature in the Soho area of London. It is set on top of a 3 storey slab block of shops and offices. It was designed by Riches and Blythin for Westminster City Council as the first large development in response to London County Council’s demand for mixed-use schemes in central areas. The block was built using a insitu reinforced concrete structure, faced with brick and reconstructed stone.